injury


injury
injury 1 Injury, hurt, damage, harm, mischief mean the act or the result of inflicting on a person or thing something that causes loss or pain.
Injury is the comprehensive term referable to an act or to a result of that act which involves a violation of a right or of health, freedom, and soundness of body or mind, or causes a partial or entire loss of something of value
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an injury to his eyes

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an injury to his reputation

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forgive an injury

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the very essence of civil liberty . . . consists in the right of every individual to claim the protection of laws, whenever he receives an injuryJohn Marshall

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mental or emotional upset is just as truly an injury to the body as a bone fracture, a burn or a bacterial infection— G. W. Gray

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a great injury could be done to our nation ... if this political campaign were to descend to the level of competitive threats and veiled hints— A. E. Stevenson

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Hurt, applies basically to a physical injury (as a wound, lesion, or contusion) that results from a hit, a stab, or a blow
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get him to bed, and let his hurt be looked to— Shak.

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rattleweed, made into a tincture, is better than arnica for hurts of every sort— Emily Holt

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In extended use hurt applies chiefly to an act or result that involves pain, suffering, or loss; thus, a person whose rights as an heir have been violated may be said to suffer an injury but not a hurt; a person whose reputation has been damaged by a false rumor has suffered both an injury to his business and a hurt to his feelings; a dentist in drilling a tooth may cause a hurt, but not commonly an injury
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leaving forever to the aggressor the choice of time and place and means to cause greatest hurt to us— Eisenhower

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Damage applies to an injury that involves loss (as in property, in value, or in usefulness)
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the fire caused great damage to the house

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repair the damage done to the cathedral by the bombs

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deliver Helen, and all damage else—as honor, loss of time, travail, expense . . . shall be struck off— Shak.

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Harm (usually without an article) is referable to an evil that injures or may injure; often it suggests a consequent suffering (as grief or shame)
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I meant no harm

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almost every evening he saw Lucy. The inexperienced little wife apprehended no harm in his visits— Meredith

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the men were terrified of Yusuf's cruelty, and wanted to retreat out of harm's way—Forester

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Mischief carries a stronger reference to the person or thing that works harm or is capable of inflicting injury; it applies either to the harm or injury that results from an agent or agency
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one failure led to another, suspicion became general, and the mischief was done— Todd

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that's the mischief of the Modernists .... They don't claim that the Divine revelation has been supplanted or even added to, but that it has been amplified— Mackenzie

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or occasionally to the aspect of a situation that causes harm or vexation
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the mischief is that people—especially the young—do not confine themselves to one cocktail— Bennett

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and faith, 'tis pleasant till 'tis past: the mischief is that 'twill not last— Housman

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Analogous words: *distress, suffering, agony, misery: *pain, pang: violation, transgression, trespass, infringement (see BREACH): detriment (see corresponding adjective at PERNICIOUS): *evil, ill
2 wrong, injustice, grievance
Analogous words: see those at INJURY 1

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • injury — in·ju·ry n pl ries [Latin injuria, from injurus injurious, from in not + jur jus right] 1: an act that wrongs or harms another; specif: a violation of a legally protected interest (as the physical or mental well being, property, reputation, or… …   Law dictionary

  • injury — in‧ju‧ry [ˈɪndʒəri] noun injuries PLURALFORM [countable, uncountable] 1. physical harm to a person, for example in an accident: • Mr. Lewis was awarded $75,000 as compensation for injuries suffered in the accident. • absence from work due to… …   Financial and business terms

  • Injury — is damage to a biological organism which can be classified on various bases. Contents 1 Classification 1.1 By cause 1.2 By location 1.3 By activity …   Wikipedia

  • Injury — In ju*ry, n.; pl. {Injuries}. [OE. injurie, L. injuria, fr. injurius injurious, wrongful, unjust; pref. in not + jus, juris, right, law, justice: cf. F. injure. See {Just}, a.] Any damage or hurt done to a person or thing; detriment to, or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • injury — (n.) late 14c., harm, damage, loss; a specific injury, from Anglo Fr. injurie wrongful action, from L. injuria wrong, hurt, injustice, insult, noun use of fem. of injurius wrongful, unjust, from in not, opposite of (see IN (Cf. in ) (1)) + jus… …   Etymology dictionary

  • injury — [n] hurt, harm abrasion, abuse, affliction, affront, agony, bad, bite, blemish, boo boo*, bruise, burn, chop, cramp, cut, damage, deformation, detriment, discomfiture, disservice, distress, evil, fracture, gash, grievance, hemorrhage, ill,… …   New thesaurus

  • injury — ► NOUN (pl. injuries) 1) an instance of being injured. 2) the fact of being injured; harm or damage. ORIGIN Latin injuria a wrong …   English terms dictionary

  • injury — [in′jə rē] n. pl. injuries [ME iniurie < L injuria < injurius, wrongful, unjust < in , not + jus (gen. juris), right, justice: see JUST1] 1. physical harm or damage to a person, property, etc. 2. an injurious act; specif., a) an offense… …   English World dictionary

  • injury — Any wrong or damage done to another, either in his person, rights, reputation, or property. The invasion of any legally protected interest of another. Restatement, Second, Torts, No. 7. Absolute injuries. Injuries to those rights which a person… …   Black's law dictionary

  • injury — Any wrong or damage done to another, either in his person, rights, reputation, or property. The invasion of any legally protected interest of another. Restatement, Second, Torts, No. 7. Absolute injuries. Injuries to those rights which a person… …   Black's law dictionary


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